football

The boy who loved soccer in Haiti grew up to love football in Buffalo

First, Rev. Chuck White did not understand what was happening. He heard a loud bang from a wall and felt the ground swell.

Then he knew.

The 2010 earthquake in Haiti killed more than a million people and displaced thousands more.

White is the pastor of First Trinity Lutheran Church in the Buffalo suburb of Tonaora. A few years before the earthquake, his church began work at the Mission of the Children of Israel Orphanage in Les Cayes, 120 miles from Port-au-Prince.

He and his wife, Susan, adopted two children from an orphanage in 2007, but did not have to take them home in 2010; The mile bureaucracy continues to block it. Chuck and Susan wanted to join their four biological children. And there will be tears everywhere if the travel visa is denied again every year.

Wisken received with the sword for the Catholic State Championship in 2019.
Then came the earthquake. Chuck and his mission team, at these critical moments, lead the children to the protection of the soccer field, an open space away from buildings. That area has long been a different kind of refuge for his adopted son Wisken, who spent a lot of time happily playing with the other children there.

However, the epicenter of the earthquake was reported underground; Haitian authorities said Lovely, 11, and Wisken, 7, could leave their new homes in the United States by the end of the year. They arrived in Buffalo six days after the earthquake and couldn’t believe what they saw.

This is Buffalo, there was a lot of snow on the ground, Chuck said about the January day. They went to the back door, looked at the snow, and staggered. Then they would warm up and go back inside and then open the door again and laugh some more.

Lovely is now 22 years old and works in childcare. Wisken is 18 years old and a senior at Canisius High School, he is the defending Catholic state champion in soccer. He plays with wide receivers on offense, cornerbacks and defense, and on special teams he kicks, kicks and kicks field goals and extra points.

He rarely leaves the field, said assistant head coach and special team coach Bryce Hopkins.

Canisius St. Francis High School will play Saturday in the local Catholic League championship game; It will end with a cut spring season, this time without a state title game.

The american won a game
An American story of how Wisken went from that soccer field in Haiti to a soccer field in Buffalo. Soccer was his first love; All the children in the orphanage played it. And when he arrived in the United States, that love accompanied him until soccer won him.

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His father said that at first we gave him a kind of ball (basketball, soccer) and he kicked it like a soccer ball, his father said. Everything was a soccer ball.

Then, as the years went by, Wisken saw how much Buffalo liked the bills. He wanted to try football. So, as an eighth grader at Christian Central Academy, he told his parents that he wanted to go to Canisius and play soccer there. His parents liked the Canisius part because it was to study on the basis of faith, but his mother was not so sure about the football part.

She said that many children were injured while playing soccer. That is what you are hearing.

Rev. Chuck White and his wife Susan in Haiti in 2004 with the children that Lovely and Wisken will adopt.
So Wisken played soccer as a new player, but he didn’t stop worrying his parents about soccer until he finally got ugly and tried to coach him for the junior varsity team. He first he fought, trying to learn the rules and subtleties of the game. But by then he had become an expert at kicking; He had known how to do it for a long time.

As a junior, Wisken kicked for the varsity team and emerged as the indomitable hero of the state championship game in 2019, the last time. Canisius defeated Bronx Cardinal Hayes, 25-24, in hit book form. Quarterback Tyler Buck ended up hitting receiver Nick McMillan for a 13-yard TD and fullback CJ J Ozlins crashed in a two-point winning conversion.

Cardinal Hayes made four touchdowns but made no changes. Canisius had three touchdowns, plus Wisken’s 28-yard field goal and his two extra points.

It’s simple math, Hopkins says. Three touchdowns don’t beat four, except Wisken.

Think of Canisius as Kicker High, in the sense of Penn State linebacker U All University. And the other day Howell signed a free agent contract with the Tennessee Titans.

Hopkins says there was a lot of pressure on Wisken last year, following in these guys’ footsteps, but it’s such that he doesn’t feel the pressure.

Football started late

Wisken hasn’t played anything but kicks as a junior. But this spring, as a senior, he made his debut as a force. He scored 227 points in a 633-0 win over rival St. Joseph’s Collegiate Institute: two touchdowns on nine receptions for nine wickets on extra points and one more for an interception. Canisius The Buffalo News is number one in the large schools poll and the Wisken team’s top scorer.

“We don’t have kids who started playing soccer so late that this was a success, I don’t know,” Canisius coach Rich Robbins said. He is referring to how hard it works.

And not only in football. According to his mother’s calculations, the instruments he plays include saxophones, tenor sax, piano, guitar, yukuli, and drums for Sunday worship in the First Trinity. God gave him a lot of talent, he said.

Wisken Lachberg, Ltd., will go to the university’s Liberty University, where he hopes to move up as a soccer team. And he looked up from him. He asks about Greg Rousseau, the top pick on the bill, whose mother and father live in Haiti, and Wisken has ready answers.

He says he’s great. I hope that one day he will be mine.

Wisken 5-11, 180 pounds as it seems impossible.

On the other hand, his whole life is still a possibility.

“I am very grateful for what my parents have done for me,” he said. I am grateful to them.

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